Convert High Bit Characters to HTML ASCII Codes

When you find yourself with those pesky high bit characters, you’ll want to be sure to replace them with their corresponding HTML ASCII Codes. This will ensure the HTML in your Email displays correctly, and does not show up with odd wingdings and whosiewhats in the middle of a paragraph.

Here is a handy list to keep around:

  - non-breaking space - Mostly used to "glue" the last two words of a headline or paragraph together to avoid "orphans" or "widows".

® - registered trademark - Also referred to as an "R ball". This character becomes exponentially more difficult to handle when you want to superscript.

™ - trademark - This character is already superscripted, and is easy to toss into an email.

— - m-dash (old-school) - This dash is the width of an "m".

— - m-dash (new-school) - This dash is the width of an "m".

– - n-dash (old-school) - This dash is the width of an "n".

– - n-dash (new-school) - This dash is the width of an "n".

• - bullet - When creating a bulleted list, be sure to use this code instead of the dark circle character.

‑ - Non-breaking Hyphen - This character will glue hyphenated items together and treat them as one word. Add this to phone numbers (or any hyphenated words) and they will stop breaking onto two lines.

“/” - left/right double quote - Replace any quote marks with the corresponding left or right quote mark. First, because a quote mark from a keyboard is HTML code, and can cause rendering issues. Secondly, because of typography. Quotes look better when they are angled left or right.

‘/’ - left/right single quote - Replace any apostrophe or single quote marks with the corresponding left or right single quote mark. This is because of typography. Apostrophes and single quote marks look better when they are angled left or right.

€ - Euro